Bible Readings

THE IMPORTANCE OF READING

The Apostle Paul writes “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works”.

Have you ever thought about this? The Bible is inspired by God Himself! It is His Word, containing His wisdom, His goodness, His intentions, His judgements, His heart. Are you interested in understanding God’s will?

Most Christadelphians follow a plan of Bible Reading called The Bible Companion. There is nothing special at all about this plan. It is simply a method by which you can be sure that by the end of a year, you have read the whole of the Bible, Old Testament once and New Testament twice. The plan starts on January 1st in Genesis, Psalms and Matthew and works its way through the scriptures as the year goes along.

THE IMPORTANCE OF READING

The Apostle Paul writes “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works”.

Have you ever thought about this? The Bible is inspired by God Himself! It is His Word, containing His wisdom, His goodness, His intentions, His judgements, His heart. Are you interested in understanding God’s will?

Most Christadelphians follow a plan of Bible Reading called The Bible Companion. There is nothing special at all about this plan. It is simply a method by which you can be sure that by the end of a year, you have read the whole of the Bible, Old Testament once and New Testament twice. The plan starts on January 1st in Genesis, Psalms and Matthew and works its way through the scriptures as the year goes along.

OUR SERVICES

The Name ‘Christadelphian’ means ‘Brethren and Sisters in Christ’ and has been used since 1865.  We are ordinary people with a shared faith and our distinctive beliefs go back to the teaching of Jesus and the Apostles in the 1st Century.

We refer to our members collectively as an ‘ecclesia’. This is the New Testament Greek word usually translated as ‘church’ in our English Bibles. Over the years, a church has come to refer more to a building rather than the people. Since the building in which we meet has no relevance to our salvation (Acts 7:48-50), we call ourselves an ‘ecclesia’, that is, a people called out to serve God. As the Bible states in Ephesians 2:18-22, God’s building is His people.